5th, 6th protests held for dogs killed

Wednesday, May 2, 2018
Protestors held two separate protests at the Barry County Judicial Center, Saturday and Tuesday, calling for action to be taken in the case of three dogs shot to death in Eagle Rock in March. The Saturday protest was the fifth consecutive weekend activists have donned orange for the cause, and Tuesday’s event was the sixth since the dogs were killed. Previous protests have been at the entrance to Paradise Cove Camping Resort, the Barry County Courthouse and in Golden. The Barry County Sheriff’s Office has turned over requests for charges in the case to Barry County Prosecutor Amy Boxx. No action has been taken on the requests. Boxx said last week she is aware of the attention the case has received, and “prosecutorial ethics, longstanding policy and best legal practice mandate that no discussion be had concerning that or any matter pending determination of charges, if any.” Kyle Troutman/editor@cassville-democrat.com

Protestors held two separate protests at the Barry County Judicial Center, Saturday and Tuesday, calling for action to be taken in the case of three dogs shot to death in Eagle Rock in March.

Dani Johnson, right, owner of the three dogs shot to death in Eagle Rock in March, was on hand at the Judicial Center Tuesday asking for action to be taken in the case. Kyle Troutman/editor@cassville-democrat.com
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    Leafing through the May issue of Vanity Fair at the drugstore today, I happened on their feature about the London serial animal-killer (who may be more than one person). Hundreds of cats, plus sundry squirrels and foxes, are forensically linked to the criminal; untold others, including animals of other species, may have been overlooked. Scotland Yard has 15 detectives on the case, largely because of experts’ broad consensus that the killer is apt to move on (or apt to have already moved on) to people. That’s the real story in Eagle Rock: that people who “showboat” sadistic abuse of animals have a marked propensity for escalating to humans. Typically, such crimes represent sets of addictive behaviors: ever-worse measures sustain a sense of exerting total power over victims. Consider, as contrast, this month’s Northeast Missouri case. A young pit bull named Lagertha survived two shots to the head, not to mention being dumped on conservation land without water or food. In her case, good Samaritans hapened on the scene and went to great lengths, securing the best-possible emergency care. In addition, local law-enforcement immediately grasped the significance of her plight, which bore signs of premeditation. Thus the local investigators have kept close tabs on developments, and are vigorously pursuing Laggie’s unknown assailant. They recognized early on that animal cruelty such as this never happens in a vacuum. Maybe, one of these days, Prosecuting Attorney Amy Boxx will manage to step up, too.

    -- Posted by LogicalQuestioner on Thu, May 10, 2018, at 10:02 PM
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