Cool season grasses promoted plant diversity at Field Day

Wednesday, October 9, 2019
There’s still much to learn about growing grasses in southwest Missouri. That was the message shared by Amy Hamilton, owner of Hamilton Native Outpost, a commercial producer of seeds who was one of the presenters at Field Day at the Southwest Research Center near Mt. Vernon. Hamilton reported that understanding cool season grasses is an emerging science. She displayed tall fescue, spreading its immense root system to show why the plant holds more water. When grown with hot season grasses, cool grasses provide a chain of forages for animals, and helps in dealing with insects, as 25 percent of insects eat only one plant. “We don’t understand the science of diversity,” Hamilton added. Murray Bishoff/Cassville Democrat

There’s still much to learn about growing grasses in southwest Missouri.

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