Richardson gives Monarch talk at library

Wednesday, October 21, 2015
Monarch enthusiast and educator Karen Richardson shows mother Sonya Carter and children Bentley, Adrian and Elijah a butterfly chrysalis during a Monarch presentation at the Cassville library Friday. Richardson said it takes about 10 days for the chrysalis to transform into a butterfly, and showed a video of a butterfly emerging. She said of all the butterflies she's helped save and raise, she's only gotten to witness the amazing transformation once herself. Richardson also helps tag the winged wonders, so if found by villagers in Mexico where the Monarchs migrate, data can be sent to Monarch Watch, and advocacy and research group for the butterflies. Julia Kilmer reporter@cassville-democrat.com

Monarch enthusiast and educator Karen Richardson shows mother Sonya Carter and children Bentley, Adrian and Elijah a butterfly chrysalis during a Monarch presentation at the Cassville library Friday.

Karen Richardson holds a piece of milkweed, which acts as a host plant, food source, shelter and protectant from predators and is thus crucial to a Monarch butterfly's survival, but the plant has been decimated. Since discovering a large patch of milkweed that was mowed down, Richardson has been giving presentations in Barry County to educate residents about the importance of the plant. She said it takes about 30 milkweed plants to raise just one monarch from egg-to-adult butterfly, and one of the most important thing residents can do to help Monarchs survive is to plant milkweed. Julia Kilmer reporter@cassville-democrat.com
Monarch advocate Karen Richardson gives a presentation about the life cycle and migration of the Monarch butterfly and the importance of residents growing and protecting their primary food source, milkweed, Friday at the Cassville-branch library. Julia Kilmer reporter@cassville-democrat.com
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